About

IMAG0022

Elizabeth Hart – Independent Vaccine Investigator

The ethical aspects of over-vaccination, especially mandated vaccination, are of particular interest to me.  The potential conflicts of interests of academics working in the areas of vaccine development and promotion, and the influence of these academics on government policy, needs to be examined.

I am not ‘anti-vaccination’.  Rather, I am challenging the increasing number of questionable vaccines and repeat vaccinations being foisted upon children, adults and animals by the burgeoning and unfettered vaccine industry.  There’s a ‘big picture’ on lucrative over-vaccination which needs to be examined.

I have a degree majoring in politics and philosophy, and experience in scientific literature searching.  This background has assisted me in researching and lobbying on over-vaccination.

My interest in vaccination was initiated after I discovered companion animals were being unnecessarily revaccinated every year, and needlessly being subjected to the risk of an adverse reaction to vaccination.

My experience in investigating over-vaccination of pets is informing my investigation into lucrative over-vaccination of people, as there are interesting comparisons to be made.

Along with my colleague Bea Mies, I have undertaken extensive investigation and correspondence on unnecessary vaccination of pets.

As a result of Bea’s and my work in this area, over-vaccination of pets has come under the spotlight in Australia, see for example the review by consumer watchdog CHOICE: “Pet vaccination: Over-vaccinating your pet could be harmful to their health as well as your own hip pocket“.  The ABC has also investigated this issue i.e. “Questions raised over pet vaccination“.  (See Over-vaccination.net’s web page on Over-vaccination of pets – an unethical practice for further background.)

I can be contacted via email: eliz.hart25@gmail.com

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Disclaimer: The purpose of this website is to provoke discussion on vaccination practice.  Readers are encouraged to do their own research on this topic to support any decisions regarding vaccination.